pests and diseases

The SA Forestry team has produced a large format, full colour poster with details of all the major Pests and Diseases threatening commercial plantations in South Africa.

The Poster has been compiled and produced in collaboration with the Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute of the University of Pretoria (Fabi). It includes info about the biology, geographic distribution, symptoms and management strategy of 11 pests and 10 pathogens currently threatening commercial plantations in South Africa.

Pitch canker

Pitch canker

Trees affected include the main Eucalyptus, Pine and Wattle species that are widely planted in South Africa.

The poster includes photos of all the pests and pathogens – as well as the symptoms that can be seen on the trees – to help foresters identify problems in their plantations.

wattle rust

Wattle rust

The information in this poster is current, and includes recent arrivals in South Africa, including the wattle rust (Uromycladium acaciae), the shell lerp psyllid (Spondyliaspis c.f. plicatuloides) and the eucalyptus gall wasp (Ophelimus maskelli).

The poster is ideal for sticking up on the wall of forestry offices to help foresters keep their trees healthy.

To obtain a copy of the poster, contact Debbie on email: Debbie@saforestrymagazine.co.za. The cost is R50 plus cost of mailing the poster to you.

Cossid moth

Cossid moth



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